IMPACT REPORT 2021
– highlights

In 2021 our wind, solar and hydro projects generated just over 110,000 MWh of renewable electricity, enough to power over 30,000 UK homes or 28% of all UK EV journeys. Our portfolio also delivered 49,515 tonnes of Carbon Dioxide emissions reductions, despite low wind speeds during the year and planned operational work at our biggest wind farm, Caton Moor.

Below are just some of our achievements from 2021:

  • Constructed our first battery storage project at Wicken near Milton Keynes, while capital was also committed, and construction commissioned on a further 20MW battery serving our home city of Bristol.
  • Invested in a new ‘direct wire’ commercial solar roof array, with the clean electricity generated supplying the industrial host.
  • While our own emissions are already low, we joined B Corp’s ‘Climate Collective’ and pledged to reach net zero as a business by 2030.

A full analysis of our impact can be accessed in our 2021 Annual Report here.

Enough to power 30000 homes
Or 28% of all UK electrical vehicle journeys
“As well as generating emission reductions from our 16 wind farms and hydro sites across the UK, we have constructed our first battery storage project this year and funded new rooftop solar arrays which are delivering power to factories in the North East using the power of the sun. We are also proud to report that Thrive was recognised by B Corp as one of its ‘Best for the World’ companies, amongst the top 5% of B Corps globally in the environment category.”

Matthew Clayton, Managing Director, Thrive Renewables

Read our annual report

Read our annual report

B Corp certification

B Corp certification

Net Zero commitment

Net Zero commitment

1 Impact Portfolio describing the Thrive’s share of projects owned plus the projects Thrive is funding.

2 RenewableUK uses BEIS’s “all non-renewable fuels” emissions statistic of 440 tonnes of carbon dioxide per GWh of electricity supplied in the Digest of UK Energy Statistics (July 2021) Table 5.14 (“Estimated carbon dioxide emissions from electricity supplied”). Carbon reduction is calculated by multiplying the total amount of electricity generated by wind per year by the number of tonnes of carbon which fossil fuels would have produced to generate the same amount of electricity.

3 We are not able to source a nationally recognised means of calculating the water saving generated by generating electricity using wind and solar rather than thermal generation. The power sector consumes over 40% of Europe’s water, mainly for cooling purposes. We have identified that nuclear consumes approximately 2.7m3/MWh, gas plants 0.7m3/MWh and coal plants 1.9m3/MWh (https://windeurope.org/). We have performed some crude, but we intend conservative analysis, using the UKs 2020 generation mix (Energy Trends March 2021 (publishing.service.gov.uk)), to derive a conservative average water consumption per MWh figure. We believe that the 0.58m3/MWh is conservative as it attributes no water consumption to other thermal sources such as oil and bioenergy, or hydro. We have multiplied Thrive’s generation by this factor, assuming that if our renewable projects had not generated this electricity, the UK grid mix would have, arriving at 65,480m3 of water.

4 Water saved figure is lower than 2020 as UK grid used significantly less coal, nuclear and gas in 2020, and Thrive generation was 10% lower.

5 Calculated using the most recent statistics from the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) showing that annual GB average domestic household consumption is 3,748kWh (as of December 2021, updated annually). Statistics Explained – RenewableUK

6 The average electricity consumption of an electric vehicle is 275Wh/mile (https://ev-database.uk/cheatsheet/energy-consumption-electric-car) and Vehicle Licensing Statistics: Annual 2020 (publishing.service.gov.uk), the average annual car mileage is 6,800 miles (nts0901.ods (live.com), the UK electric car fleet as of Sept 2021 is 216,000 (Vehicle Licensing Statistics: Annual 2020 (publishing.service.gov.uk), and the average annual mileage of 60,179 Electric Vehicles, (27.9% of the UK’s Electric Car Fleet)